Find a recipe!

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Braciole: The best Italian dish you've never had!

Braciole! Excuse the sloppy presentation, but in the interest
of authenticity, libations may have been a factor ;)
While everyone else was busy eating their tough, bland cuts of rump roast for Sunday dinner, those of us who grew up poor were dining on soft, tender succulent pot roast. Chuck is the most flavorful cut of beef, but it requires long, slow cooking. The Italians shorten the cooking time by slicing the chuck roast into strips, then pounding the heck out of them. They up the ante by smearing them with a paste rub (usually made of pine nuts, parsley, Parmesan cheese and garlic), then rolling them up, searing them, covering with tomato sauce and baking like little pot roasts. (In Italian, they call them "involtini", meaning little bundles. "Braciole" is an American-Italian word.)

This dish is something that an Italian family would put on the stove (or in the oven) to cook all day. They'd also throw meatballs or extra cuts of pork into it and the resulting meaty, tomato deliciousness would be served on pasta. It's not a fancy dish, it's a peasant dish. Who knew the peasants ate so well?

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Tender Beef Brisket


So tender, it's falling apart!

Nothing says Texas like a delicious smoked beef brisket. The problem is, so many have trouble getting it right. It often ends up between charcoal and beef jerky. Chances are, if you're reading this right now, that's why you're here.

Well we're here to tell you, our friends, you too can have mouth watering delicious beef brisket that'll make you never want to eat it from a restaurant again. I'm talking about the kind of beef brisket you could eat with a cheap plastic fork.

We come from a long line of serious BBQ smokers. We do not play. Our family would wake up at 3am to begin building a fire. Now days, that's really just way too much work. There are simpler ways to get a delicious brisket.